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Android Studio Release Notes

Android Studio is the official IDE for Android development, and includes everything you need to build Android apps.

To get the latest version, click Help > Check for updates (on Mac, Android Studio > Check for updates).

You can also download Android Studio here.

If you encounter problems in Android Studio, check the Known Issues or Troubleshoot page.

3.1 (March 2018)

Android Studio 3.1.0 is a major release that includes a variety of new features and improvements.

3.1.1 (April 2018)

This update to Android Studio 3.1 includes fixes for the following bugs:

  • In some cases, when a project created in Android Studio 3.0 was opened for the first time in Android Studio 3.1, the Gradle-aware Make task was removed from the Before launch area in Run/Debug Configurations. The result was that projects did not build when the Run or Debug button was clicked, which in turn caused failures such as deployment of incorrect APKs and crashes when using Instant Run.

    To solve this problem, Android Studio 3.1.1 adds the Gradle-aware Make task to the run configuration for projects that are missing this entry. This modification occurs after the first Gradle sync when the project is loaded.

  • The debugger crashed when debugging a layout with a text box if advanced profiling was enabled.
  • Android Studio froze after you clicked Build Variants.
  • AAR (Android archive) files were extracted twice, once during the Gradle sync process and once during the Gradle build process.
  • Elements were missing from some vector drawables imported from SVG files.
  • The warning regarding the deprecation of the compile dependency configuration has been updated with better guidance regarding the implementation and api configurations. For details of migrating away from using the compile configuration, see the documentation for the new dependency configurations.

Coding/IDE

IntelliJ 2017.3.3

The core Android Studio IDE has been updated with improvements from IntelliJ IDEA through the 2017.3.3 release. Improvements include better control flow analysis for collections and strings, improved nullability inference, new quick fixes, and much more.

For details, see the JetBrains release notes for IntelliJ IDEA versions 2017.2 and 2017.3, as well as the JetBrains release notes for bug-fix updates.

SQL editing improvements with Room

When you use the Room database library, you can take advantage of several improvements to SQL editing:

For information on using SQL with Room, see Save data in a local database using Room.

Updates to data binding

This update includes several improvements for data binding:

Compiler and Gradle

D8 is the default DEX compiler

The D8 compiler is now used by default for generating DEX bytecode.

This new DEX compiler brings with it several benefits, including the following:

You don't need to make any changes to your code or your development workflow to get these benefits, unless you had previously manually disabled the D8 compiler. If you set android.enableD8 to false in your gradle.properties, either delete that flag or set it to true:

android.enableD8=true

For details, see New DEX compiler.

Incremental desugaring

For projects that use Java 8 language features, incremental desugaring is enabled by default, which can improve build times.

Desugaring converts syntactic sugar into a form that the compiler can process more efficiently.

You can disable incremental desugaring by specifying the following in your project's gradle.properties file:

android.enableIncrementalDesugaring=false

Simplified output window

The Gradle Console has been replaced with the Build window, which has Sync and Build tabs.

For details about how to use the new, simplified Build window, see Monitor the build process.

Batch updates and indexing concurrency

The Gradle sync and IDE indexing processes are now much more efficient, reducing time wasted on many redundant indexing operations.

C++ and LLDB

We have made many quality and performance improvements in the coding, syncing, building, and debugging phases of C++ development. Improvements include the following:

Kotlin

Kotlin upgraded to version 1.2.30

Android Studio 3.1 includes Kotlin version 1.2.30.

Kotlin code now analyzed with command-line lint check

Running lint from the command line now analyzes your Kotlin classes.

For each project that you would like to run lint on, Google's Maven repository must be included in the top-level build.gradle file. The Maven repository is already included for projects created in Android Studio 3.0 and higher.

Performance tools

Sample native C++ processes with CPU Profiler

The CPU Profiler now includes a default configuration to record sampled traces of your app's native threads. You can use this configuration by deploying your app to a device running Android 8.0 (API level 26) or higher and then selecting Sampled (Native) from the CPU Profiler's recording configurations dropdown menu. After that, record and inspect a trace as you normally would.

You can change default settings, such as the sampling interval, by creating a recording configuration.

To switch back to tracing your Java threads, select either a Sampled (Java) or Instrumented (Java) configuration.

Filter CPU traces, memory allocation results, and heap dumps

The CPU Profiler and Memory Profiler include a search feature that allows you to filter results from recording a method trace, memory allocations, or heap dump.

To search, click Filter in the top-right corner of the pane, type your query, and press Enter.

Tip: You can also open the search field by pressing Control + F (Command + F on Mac).

In the CPU Profiler's Flame Chart tab, call stacks that include methods related to your search query are highlighted and moved to the left side of the chart.

For more information on filtering by method, class, or package name, see Record and inspect method traces.

Request tab in the Network Profiler

The Network Profiler now includes a Request tab that provides details about network requests during the selected timeline. In previous versions, the Network Profiler only provided information about network responses.

Thread View in the Network Profiler

After selecting a portion of the timeline in the Network Profiler, you can select one of the following tabs to see more detail about the network activity during that timeframe:

Layout Inspector

The Layout Inspector gained new features, including some functionality previously provided by the deprecated Hierarchy Viewer and Pixel Perfect tools:

Layout Editor

The Palette in the Layout Editor has received many improvements:

You can use the new Convert view command in the Component tree or design editor to convert a view or layout to another type of view or layout.

You can now easily create constraints to items near the selected view using the new Create a connection buttons in the view inspector at the top of the Attributes window.

Run and Instant Run

The behavior of the Use same selection for future launches option in the Select deployment target dialog has been made more consistent. If the Use same selection option is enabled, then the Select deployment target dialog opens only the first time that you use the Run command until the selected device is no longer connected.

When targeting a device running Android 8.0 (API level 26) or higher, Instant Run can deploy changes to resources without causing an application restart. This is possible because the resources are contained in a split APK.

Emulator

For details of what's new and changed in the emulator since Android Studio 3.0, see the Android Emulator release notes from version 27.0.2 through version 27.1.12.

Major improvements include the following:

User interface and user experience improvements

More tooltips, keyboard shortcuts, and helpful messages

We have added tooltips and helpful message overlays in many places throughout Android Studio.

To see keyboard shortcuts for many commands, just hold the mouse pointer over a button until the tooltip appears.

Tools > Android menu removed

The Tools > Android menu has been removed. Commands that were previously under this menu have been moved.

Device Monitor available from the command line

In Android Studio 3.1, the Device Monitor serves less of a role than it previously did. In many cases, the functionality available through the Device Monitor is now provided by new and improved tools.

See the Device Monitor documentation for instructions for invoking the Device Monitor from the command line and for details of the tools available through the Device Monitor.

3.0 (October 2017)

Android Studio 3.0.0 is a major release that includes a variety of new features and improvements.

macOS users: If you are updating an older version of Android Studio, you may encounter an update error dialog that says "Some conflicts were found in the installation area". Simply ignore this error and click Cancel to resume the installation.

3.0.1 (November 2017)

This is a minor update to Android Studio 3.0 that includes general bug fixes and performance improvements.

Android Plugin for Gradle 3.0.0

The new Android plugin for Gradle includes a variety of improvements and new features, but it primarily improves build performance for projects that have a large number of modules. When using the new plugin with these large projects, you should experience the following:

This version also includes the following:

For more information about what's changed, see the Android Plugin for Gradle Release Notes.

If you're ready to upgrade to the new plugin, see Migrate to Android Plugin for Gradle 3.0.0.

Kotlin support

As announced at Google I/O 2017, the Kotlin programming language is now officially supported on Android. So with this release, Android Studio includes Kotlin language support for Android development.

You can incorporate Kotlin into your project by converting a Java file to Kotlin (click Code > Convert Java File to Kotlin File) or by creating a new Kotlin- enabled project using the New Project wizard.

To get started, read how to add Kotlin to your project.

Java 8 language features support

You can now use certain Java 8 language features and consume libraries built with Java 8. Jack is no longer required, and you should first disable Jack to use the improved Java 8 support built into the default toolchain.

To update your project to support the new Java 8 language toolchain, update the Source Compatibility and Target Compatibility to 1.8 in the Project Structure dialog (click File > Project Structure). To learn more, read how to use Java 8 language features.

Android Profiler

The new Android Profiler replaces the Android Monitor tool and provides a new suite of tools to measure your app's CPU, memory, and network usage in realtime. You can perform sample-based method tracing to time your code execution, capture heap dumps, view memory allocations, and inspect the details of network-transmitted files.

To open, click View > Tool Windows > Android Profiler (or click Android Profiler in the toolbar).

The event timeline at the top of the window shows touch events, key presses, and activity changes so you have more context to understand other performance events in the timeline.

From the Android Profiler's overview timeline, click on the CPU, MEMORY, or NETWORK timelines to access the corresponding profiler tools.

CPU Profiler

The CPU Profiler helps you analyze the CPU thread usage of your app by triggering a sample or instrumented CPU trace. Then, you can troubleshoot CPU performance issues using a variety of data views and filters.

For more information, see the CPU Profiler guide.

Memory Profiler

The Memory Profiler helps you identify memory leaks and memory churn that can lead to stutter, freezes, and even app crashes. It shows a realtime graph of your app's memory use, lets you capture a heap dump, force garbage collections, and track memory allocations.

For more information, see the Memory Profiler guide.

Network Profiler

The Network Profiler allows you to monitor the network activity of your app, inspect the payload of each of your network requests, and link back to the code that generated the network request.

For more information, see the Network Profiler guide.

APK profiling and debugging

Android Studio now allows you to profile and debug any APK without having to build it from an Android Studio project—as long as the APK is built to enable debugging and you have access to the debug symbols and source files.

To get started, click Profile or debug APK from the Android Studio Welcome screen. Or, if you already have a project open, click File > Profile or debug APK from the menu bar. This displays the unpacked APK files, but it does not decompile the code. So, to properly add breakpoints and view stack traces, you need to attach Java source files and native debug symbols.

For more information, see Profile and Debug Pre-built APKs.

Device File Explorer

The new Device File Explorer allows you to inspect your connected device's filesystem, and transfer files between the device and your computer. This replaces the filesystem tool available in DDMS.

To open, click View > Tool Windows > Device File Explorer.

For more information, see the Device File Explorer guide.

Instant Apps support

New support for Android Instant Apps allows you to create Instant Apps in your project using two new module types: Instant App modules and Feature modules (these require that you install the Instant Apps Development SDK).

Android Studio also includes a new modularize refactoring action to help you add support for Instant Apps in an existing project. For example, if you want to refactor your project to place some classes in an Instant App feature module, select the classes in the Project window and click Refactor > Modularize. In the dialog that appears, select the module where the classes should go and click OK.

And when you're ready to test your Instant App, you can build and run your Instant App module on a connected device by specifying the Instant App's URL within the run configuration launch options: Select Run > Edit Configurations, select your Instant App module, and then set the URL under Launch Options.

For more information, see Android Instant Apps.

Android Things modules

New Android Things templates in the New Project and New Module wizards to help you start developing for Android-powered IOT devices.

For more information, see how to create an Android Things project.

Adaptive Icons wizard

Image Asset Studio now supports vector drawables and allows you to create adaptive launcher icons for Android 8.0 while simultaneously creating traditional icons ("Legacy" icons) for older devices.

To start, right-click on the res folder in your project, and then click New > Image Asset. In the Asset Studio window, select Launcher Icons (Adaptive and Legacy) as the icon type.

For more information, read about Adaptive Icons.

Support for font resources

To support the new font resources in Android 8.0, Android Studio includes a font resources selector to help bundle fonts into your app or configure your project to download the fonts on the device (when available). The layout editor can also preview the fonts in your layout.

To try downloadable fonts, ensure that your device or emulator is running Google Play Services v11.2.63 or higher. For more information, read about Downloadable Fonts.

Firebase App Indexing Assistant

The Firebase Assistant has been updated with a new tutorial to test App Indexing. To open the Assistant, select Tools > Firebase. Then select App Indexing > Test App Indexing.

The tutorial includes new buttons to test your public and personal content indexing:

The App Links Assistant has been updated with the following new capabilities:

URL intent-filter validator

Android Studio now supports a special tag in the manifest file that allows you to test your intent filter URLs. These are the same tags that the App Links Assistant can create for you.

To declare a test URL for an intent filter, add a <tools:validation> element alongside the corresponding <intent-filter> element. For example:

<activity ...>
    <intent-filter>
        ...
    </intent-filter>
    <tools:validation testUrl="https://www.example.com/recipe/1138" />
</activity>

Be sure to also include xmlns:tools="http://schemas.android.com/tools" in the <manifest> tag.

If any one of the test URLs does not pass the intent filter definition, a lint error appears. Such an error still allows you to build debug variants, but it will break your release builds.

Layout Editor

The Layout Editor has been updated with a number of enhancements, including the following:

Layout Inspector

The Layout Inspector includes enhancements to make it easier to debug issues with your app layouts, including grouping properties into common categories and new search functionality in both the View Tree and the Properties panes.

APK Analyzer

You can now use the APK Analyzer from the command line with the apkanalyzer tool.

The APK Analyzer has also been updated with the following improvements:

For more information, see Analyze Your Build with APK Analyzer.

Preview for D8 DEX compiler

Android Studio 3.0 includes an optional new DEX compiler called D8. It will eventually replace the DX compiler, but you can opt-in to use the new D8 compiler now.

DEX compilation directly impacts your app's build time, .dex file size, and runtime performance. And when comparing the new D8 compiler with the current DX compiler, D8 compiles faster and outputs smaller .dex files, while having the same or better app runtime performance.

To try it, set the following in your project's gradle.properties file:

android.enableD8=true

For more information, see the blog post about the D8 compiler.

Google's Maven repository

Android Studio now uses Google’s Maven Repository by default instead of depending on the Android SDK Manager to get updates for Android Support Library, Google Play Services, Firebase, and other dependencies. This makes it easier to keep your libraries up to date, especially when using a continuous integration (CI) system.

All new projects now include the Google Maven repository by default. To update your existing project, add google() in the repositories block of the top-level build.gradle file:

allprojects {
    repositories {
        google()
    }
}

Learn more about Google's Maven repository here.

Other changes

2.3 (March 2017)

Android Studio 2.3.0 is primarily a bug fix and stability release, but it also includes a number of new features.

2.3.3 (June 2017)

This is a minor update to add support for Android O (API level 26).

2.3.2 (April 2017)

This is a minor update to Android Studio 2.3 for the following changes:

  • AVD Manager updates to support Google Play in system images.
  • Bug fixes for NDK builds when using R14+ of the NDK.

Also see corresponding updates for Android Emulator 26.0.3.

2.3.1 (April 2017)

This is a minor update to Android Studio 2.3 that fixes an issue where some physical Android devices did not work properly with Instant Run (see Issue #235879).

New

Changes

This release also includes a number of bug fixes. See all bug fixes in 2.3.0.

Known issue: Some device manufacturers block apps from automatically launching after being installed on the device. When deploying your app to a physical device using Android Studio 2.3, this restriction breaks the intended behavior of Instant Run and causes the following error output: Error: Not found; no service started. To avoid this issue, either use the emulator or enable automatic launching for your app in your device's settings. The proceedure for doing this is different for each device, so check the instructions provided by the manufacturer. For example, some affected Asus devices need to whitelist apps using the Auto-start Manager. To learn more about this issue, see Issue #235879.

2.2 (September 2016)

2.2.3 (December 2016)

This is a minor update to Android Studio 2.2. It includes a bug fixes focused around gradle, the core IDE, and lint.

Highlighted build changes:

  • ProGuard version rollback. Due to a correctness issue discovered in ProGuard 5.3.1, we have rolled back to ProGuard 5.2.1. We have worked with the ProGuard team on getting a fix quickly, and we expect to roll forward to ProGuard 5.3.2 in Android Studio 2.3 Canary 3.
  • Bug fix for aaptOptions IgnoreAssetsPattern not working properly (issue 224167)
  • Bug fix for Gradle autodownload for Constraint Layout library (issue 212128)
  • Bug fix for a JDK8/Kotlin compiler + dx issue (issue 227729)

See all bug fixes in 2.2.3.

2.2.2 (October 2016)

This is a minor update to Android Studio 2.2. It includes a number of small changes and bug fixes, including:

  • When reporting Instant Run issues through the IDE, the report now also includes logcat output for InstantRun events. To help us improve Instant Run, please enable extra logging and report any issues.
  • A number of small bug fixes for Gradle.
  • A fix for problems with generating multiple APKs.

2.2.1 (October 2016)

This is a minor update to Android Studio 2.2. It includes several bug fixes and a new feature to enable extra logging to help us troubleshoot Instant Run issues—to help us improve Instant Run, please enable extra logging and report any issues.

New

Changes

2.1 (April 2016)

The primary changes in this update provide support for development with the Android N Preview.

2.1.3 (August 2016)

This update adds compatibility with Gradle 2.14.1, which includes performance improvements, new features, and an important security fix. For more details, see the Gradle release notes.

By default, new projects in Android Studio 2.1.3 use Gradle 2.14.1. For existing projects, the IDE prompts you to upgrade to Gradle 2.14.1 and Android plugin for Gradle 2.1.3, which is required when using Gradle 2.14.1 and higher.

2.1.2 (June 2016)

This update includes a number of small changes and bug fixes:

  • Instant Run updates and bug fixes.
  • Improvements to LLDB performance and crash notifications.
  • Fixed a regression in the Android Studio 2.1.1 security update that caused git rebase to fail.

2.1.1 (May 2016)

Security release update.

The Android N platform adds support for Java 8 language features, which require a new experimental compiler called Jack. The latest version of Jack is currently supported only in Android Studio 2.1. So if you want to use Java 8 language features, you need to use Android Studio 2.1 to build your app.

Note: Instant Run is disabled when you enable the Jack compiler because they currently are not compatible.

Although Android Studio 2.1 is now stable, the Jack compiler is still experimental and you must enable it with the jackOptions property in your build.gradle file.

Other than the changes to support the N Preview, Android Studio 2.1 includes minor bug fixes and the following enhancements:

<ul>
  <li>The Java-aware C++ debugger is now enabled by default when you're

using an N device or emulator and select Native debugger mode (in the Debugger tab for your run/debug configuration).

For other build enhancements, including incremental Java compilation and dexing-in-process,update your Android plugin for Gradle to version 2.1.0.

2.0 (April 2016)

Note: If you are developing for the N Developer Preview, you should use Android Studio 2.1 Preview. Android Studio 2.0 does not support all the features required to target the N Preview. To learn more, read about how to properly set up your developer environment for the N Preview.

Instant Run:

New additions to Lint:

Additional Improvements:

Older Releases

 

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